Rethinking Macroeconomics

About Rethinking Macroeconomics

The Rethinking Macroeconomics Working Group is bringing gender dimensions into macroeconomic models, particularly in the case of care provisioning.  Researchers in the Rethinking Macroeconomics Cluster are working to modify existing macroeconomic models (e.g. overlapping generations, Keynesian, and Post-Keynesian models) to incorporate unpaid and paid care of children, the sick, disabled and the elderly in order to examine gendered impacts of specific economic policies on employment, inequality, and growth. They will draw insights for the structure of the model from the work of the other groups in the project.  The models will then be used to identify the channels through which economic policies affect or ignore the provision of care and traces the economic and distributional outcomes in the short run and in the longer run.  These new, cutting edge macromodels will demonstrate that care is economically important and help us better understand and more effectively model the links between care and standard economic variables and concerns.

Meet Rethinking Macroeconomics Researchers

Pierre-Richard Agénor
Pierre-Richard Agénor
Hallsworth Professor - University of Manchester
Elissa Braunstein
Elissa Braunstein
Professor of Economics - Colorado State University
Nancy Folbre
Nancy Folbre
Director, Program on Gender and Care Work - Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Eurydice (Evrydiki) Fotopoulou
Eurydice (Evrydiki) Fotopoulou
Lecturer - Goldsmiths, University of London
James Heintz
James Heintz
Andrew Glyn Professor of Economics - University of Massachusetts at Amherst
Özlem Onaran
Özlem Onaran
Professor of Economics, Director of Greenwich Political Economy Research Centre - University of Greenwich
Cem Oyvat
Cem Oyvat
Lecturer in Economics - University of Greenwich
Srinivas Raghav
Srinivas Raghav
Lecturer Above The Bar - NUI, Galway
Ramaa Vasudevan
Ramaa Vasudevan
Associate Professor - Colorado State University

Rethinking Macroeconomics POSTS

Microfinance and the Care Economy

Financial inclusion has been adopted as a developmental strategy with the roll-back of the developmental state under the neoliberal policy regime. As a result, mainstream private finance has utilized microcredit schemes with increasing frequency, even though such schemes initially were touted almost exclusively as tools for gender-empowerment and poverty alleviation. The relatively low rates of
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Girl playing with bubbles

(More) Economic Lessons from the Great Recession of 2008

The global financial crisis that began in 2008 resulted in the widespread destruction of jobs. Effects were felt disproportionately among subordinate racial groups and women. While mainstream analyses emphasize regulatory lapses in the financial sector as the principal factor triggering the crisis, the root causes run much deeper. Feminist and stratification economists have enlarged the
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Gendering Fiscal Policy

The importance of public physical infrastructure in stimulating productivity and economic performance is embraced by most economists. However, there is less awareness that public spending in health, social care, education, and childcare should be considered as investment in social infrastructure. We therefore develop a feminist post-Keynesian/post-Kaleckian demand-led growth model to elucidate the impact of gender
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5 researchers speaking on a panel with the CWE-GAM Working Paper Series Logo

Estimating the Role of Social Reproduction in Economic Growth

This paper presents a conceptual Kaleckian macroeconomic model and empirical analysis that link structures of economic growth and development with those of social reproduction and gender inequality.
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James Heintz speaking to audience.

CWE-GAM Rethinking Macroeconomics Working Group Presents at the EEA Annual Meeting

The 45th Eastern Economic Association Annual Meetings were held Feb. 28 – March 2, 2019 in New York City. The “Easterns”, as many economists call them, is also considered the most methodolgically diverse of the regional economics meetings (which come under the umbrella of the national American Economics Association, which holds its annual meeting each
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