Understanding and Measuring Care

About Understanding and Measuring Care

The Understanding and Measuring Care Cluster is working to gain a deeper understanding of the nature of care work by developing comprehensive measures and methodological approaches and producing new research that illustrates the intersectionality of care provisioning, economic growth and distribution.  Using South Korea as a case study, this cluster will develop and produce research through: 1) an enhanced time use survey questionnaire that captures the intensity of care, the amount of care, and the types of different care-related activities; 2) a quantitative survey that allows for matching of caregivers and care recipients, linking care demand with supply; 3) a qualitative survey to explore the nature of care provisioning; 4) site visits and interviews of organized childcare and eldercare institutions.  The cluster will also produce an extensive estimation of the current Korean care economy and projections on the demand for care in South Korea for 2030.  The qualitative and quantitative research undertaken in South Korea will highlight the need to adequately address the care needs of society and will inform the structure of our gender-aware macromodel and help to estimate a full set of key parameters for it.

Meet Understanding and Measuring Care Researchers

Seung-Eun Cha
Seung-Eun Cha
Associate Professor - University of Suwon
Ki-Soo Eun
Ki-Soo Eun
Professor - Seoul National University
Jiweon Jun
Jiweon Jun
Postdoctoral Research Fellow - University of Toronto, Seoul National University
Eunhye Kang
Eunhye Kang
Doctoral Student - Graduate School of International Studies, Seoul National University
Kijong Kim
Kijong Kim
Research Scholar - Levy Economics Institute of Bard College
Hyuna Moon
Hyuna Moon
Researcher - Institute of International Affairs, Seoul National University
Ito Peng
Ito Peng
Professor - University of Toronto
Jooyeoun Suh
Jooyeoun Suh
Postdoctoral Fellow - Institute for Women's Policy Research

Understanding and Measuring Care POSTS

A mother feeding a baby

Research Paper Proposal Request

As part of its second year of activities, the Rethinking Macroeconomics Working Group, a part of the Care Work and the Economy (CWE-GAM) Project, is issuing an open call for research papers focused on producing theoretical gender-aware macroeconomic models that incorporate care activities—of ourselves and one another, both paid and unpaid. This charge is intentionally
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Aerial view of Seoul, South Korea

Current Policies and Programs Addressing Childcare and Eldercare in South Korea

The major care policies that South Korea currently has in place are the Early Childhood Education and Care Policy, the Long-Term Care Insurance (LTCI) Program, the Maternity Protection Act, and welfare policies for the disabled. It is well-known idea that social provision can be divided in several types; power, cash, vouchers, time, services, and opportunity, by Gilbert and Neil in their book of Dimensions of Social Welfare Policy.
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A female caregiver

The Progression of South Korea’s Childcare Model

South Korea’s childcare model began to develop when the Child Welfare Act (the Act) was first introduced in 1962. Prior to that, no solid policy for childcare existed, as it was a period of political and social turmoil in the country after Korean war (1950-1953). Thanks to the Act, several nursery facilities were built during this period with foreign assistance, yet with a narrow objective of relieving the poor and numerous orphans who lost their parents during the war (Kang, 2002). The Child Welfare Act of 1962 initiated a structured system-level approach to the childcare sector. The Act was still grounded in the notion that families are solely responsible for childrearing unless the children have special needs, in which case government support and protection is warranted.
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